National College of Art & Design
WHAT DOES IT MEAN TO CREATE AND SHAPE ART AND DESIGN CURRICULUM FOR THE 21ST CENTURY LEARNER?

The change lab fosters a space where your practice as an artist, educator and activist is action orientated, cultivating critical thinking, making and innovation to investigate real world problems. The change lab explores the concept of agency and ownership through fostering collaborative teaching and learning methods.

Education is a powerful force for change, enabling us to critically reflect on the way things are, to identify social injustices and unsustainable practices and to act for a better world. Development Education (DE) is an educational process that is concerned with building a student’s knowledge, awareness and understanding of the world that they live in, and how that world is often an unequal one in terms of Human Rights and social justice (social justice is the view that everyone deserves equal economic, political, social rights, resources and opportunities). Education for Sustainable Development (ESD) extends the context of DE to go beyond the social justice thematic parameters of DE to also include issues focusing on the environment and the importance of maintaining and protecting the planet while meeting our development needs.

Change lab

 

_____

ACTION RESEARCH PROJECT

WHAT PART OF THE ASSESSMENT AND EVALUATION PROCESS DO STUDENTS FIND VALUABLE?

The aim of this arts-based action research study was to investigate the value students placed on assessment and evaluation methods. The purpose of this was to contribute further understanding of student’s view of assessment to the wider body of knowledge on assessment and equip students with skills to engage further in their education. This has been motivated by assessment coming more involved in the learning process (MacPhail et al, 2018) rather than simply testing after the fact, evidenced in the inclusion of two classroom-based assessments in Junior Cycle Visual Art (NCCA, 2016). This initiative to mix formative and summative assessment methods has been a long progression to balance the scales of approaches to assessment in Irish post primary education. As Anne Looney (2006, p. 352), chief executive of the NCCA from 2001 to 2016, puts it:

"In post-primary schools, the silence is filled with the deafening noise of two formal public examinations, which, despite the efforts of the NCCA in its Assessment for Learning Initiative, drowns out the whispers of other assessment discourse."

 
Get In Touch

© David Bowe NCAD 2019